piecufa

piecufa

Social media has yet to show its supposed promise as<br><img src="static.ddmcdn.com/gif/sandman-ride.jpg"><br> a great leveler of American democracy, according to a new study from the Pew Research Center&#x2019;s Internet and American Life Project, which found that <b>sharp</b> divisions in political participation among socioeconomic groups persist despite the <b>presence</b> of <b>Facebook</b> and Twitter.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Despite the airstrikes, Gaddafi's forces were<br><img src="d364y98vz4769w.cloudfront.net/drawings/images/000/001/102/f…"><br> digging in outside Ajdabiya, which straddles highways that go north to Benghazi and east across the desert to Tobruk.“Batman: Night of Owls” is No.<br> 1 on the hardcover <b>list.<br></b> The Mariinsky II, with a production of “Iolanta,” becomes the newest <b>part</b> of an arts complex<br><img src="cartoonswalls.com/walls/green_tinkerbell_fairy_lovely_wallp…"><br> in St. Petersburg, Russia.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The Wellcome Trust is now one <b>of</b> the most powerful players in British and international science.<br> What can we expect from its incoming director?April has brought with it a <b>mini-reshuffle</b> of some of the biggest jobs <b>in</b> British science. Three weeks into <b>his</b> new role, Sir Mark Walport is already <b>stamping</b> his mark on the Government Office for Science.<br> Imran Khan has <b>traded</b> the cramped but energetic office of the Campaign for Science and Engineering (CaSE) for a plusher berth at <b>the</b><br><img src="lovelystationery.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/lovely-stat…"><br> British Science <b>Association.</b> Earlier this week, Sarah Main, a molecular biologist with experience at the Medical Research Council and <b>the</b> Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, was named as Khan's successor at CaSE. And yesterday, Jeremy Farrar, professor of tropical medicine and global health at Oxford University was unveiled as the new director of the Wellcome Trust.<br><br><img src="ragetoons.com/cartoons/2010/20100530-exam-fart-rage.png"><br> With Wellcome now the world's third largest charitable foundation, dispensing around £700 million each year, Farrar's appointment has sparked particular interest.<br> His move to Wellcome's headquarters in Euston will be a sharp contrast to the seventeen years he has spent as head of Oxford's Wellcome-funded Clinical Research Unit in Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam. Given Wellcome's emphasis on long-term investment in world-class researchers, it's a characteristic move to appoint one of their own top scientists to the director role, and a <b>sign</b> of the growing maturity of their funding strategy.Farrar's<br> track record at the frontiers of infectious disease research, including extensive work<br><img src="i1.mirror.co.uk/incoming/article1452655.ece/ALTERNATES/s927…"><br> on H5N1 avian flu, makes his appointment feel remarkably timely, as the world nervously monitors the progress of the current <b>H7N9</b> outbreak in China, which as of yesterday had infected 108 people and led to 22 deaths. Indeed, with serendipitous timing, on the same day that Farrar's appointment was announced, the journal Nature published a thoughtful commentary on H7N9 by Peter Horby, one of his close <b>colleagues</b> in Vietnam. Farrar's background has led some to speculate that he may further scale up Wellcome's investment in <b>biomedical</b> research in the developing world. But he will also have to grapple with dilemmas closer to home.<br> As the largest non-governmental funder of research within the UK system, Wellcome has an increasingly powerful voice in science policy, particularly at a time <b>when</b> the research councils <b>are</b> braced for several more years of flat cash funding, and ever tighter scrutiny of their budgets by the <b>bean</b> counters in HM Treasury (as Steven Hill described on this blog yesterday). With a fat, healthy endowment, and <b>no</b> political overlords to answer to, Wellcome can provide a strong, independent <b>perspective</b> on the broader health of the UK's research system. In the <b>run-up</b> to the last general election, it produced an influential analysis of the economic case for investing in biomedical research.<br> It <b>is</b> now <b>in</b> the process of updating this work, but it will be interesting to see whether Farrar uses his position to play a more prominent role in funding debates ahead of the next general election. In the most extreme scenario, Wellcome could even threaten to divert a proportion of its funding away from the UK if <b>flat</b> or declining public investment is seen to be weakening the overall sustainability of its research and innovation system. During his decade in charge, Sir Mark <b>Walport</b> <b>skilfully</b> deployed the trust's financial clout to advance distinctive policy positions <b>on</b> genomics, translational research, open access, open data and science education.<br> It will be intriguing to see how Farrar builds on these foundations, and which new agendas he moves to the fore. This recent interview on the BBC World Service gives a few <a href = "forex-growth-bot.webs.com">forex growth bot </a> Farrar's likely concerns.Perhaps<br> <b>unique</b> among UK institutions, Wellcome has the funding muscle to make or break entire research fields.<br> For example, in their <b>recent</b> book on the 'promethean promises of the new biology', Hilary and <b>Steven</b> Rose, describe the crucial role that Wellcome played in the Human Genome Project: "Without the massive financial intervention of Wellcome, sometimes spoken of as the ten-thousand-pound gorilla in the genomics room, it is far from <b>clear</b> that the public project would have been driven through."From<br> October, when he takes the reins, Jeremy Farrar will have the money (£14.5 billion at the last count), a unique platform, and a crack team of staff to draw on (including seasoned pros like Ted Bianco, Clare <b>Matterson</b> and David Lynn, and<br><img src="assets.shitbrix.com/hashed_silo_content/c25/562/a58/resized…"><br> more recent star signings like Mark "Geek Manifesto" Henderson). But with all that power comes heightened responsibility. And an organisation that has proved impressively effective, but hasn't <b>always</b> needed to be as transparent and <b>accountable</b> as its public counterparts, will have to keep pace with the demands and expectations of scientists, policymakers, the media and the public.James Wilsdon is professor of science and democracy at the University of Sussex and is on Twitter <b>@jameswilsdonScience</b> <b>policyJames</b> Wilsdonguardian.co.uk &copy; 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies.<br> All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Fear of libel action stopped UK publication of Amanda Knox's memoir – and shows again how little<br><img src="favim.com/orig/201103/30/Favim.com-10276.jpg"><br> we care about free speechWe <b>flatter</b> ourselves when we boast of mastery of the ironic style.<br> <b>Unlike</b> literal-minded Germans <b>and</b> Americans, we are not ashamed to live behind masks and speak <b>in</b> riddles.<br> On the contrary, we delight in it and damn foreigners for their <b>insistence</b> on saying what they mean. They lack our sophistication. The delightfully quirky British sense of humour leaves them cold.If we were harder on ourselves, we would notice that on the reverse <b>side</b> of the ironic coin are the smuttiness and evasiveness that always accompany self-censorship.<br> We would wonder <b>how</b> we ended up in a country where fear of causing offence or crossing a powerful or litigious interest had become so ingrained the British could no longer speak plainly<br><img src="static.manoramaonline.com/ranked/online/MM/The_Week/COVER_S…"><br> or read freely.If you think I am being unpatriotic, try this test. Go <b>to</b> your nearest bookshop and ask for copies of Amanda Knox's memoir Waiting to be Heard or Lawrence Wright's Going Clear.Knox's<br> conviction for the murder of Meredith Kercher, and her subsequent acquittal, was one of the most sensational court cases of the past decade.<br> "Foxy Knoxy's" good looks and lurid love <b>life</b> added a ghoulish and <b>occasionally</b> misogynistic fascination to the affair. HarperCollins believed her story would sell round the world and paid Knox <b>$4m</b> <b>for</b> it.Wright's<br> book is very different. He is a Pulitzer prize-winner, whose investigation into Scientology is in the <b>gruelling</b> but rewarding tradition of the best of American journalism.<br> Going Clear is exhaustive, fact-checked half to death and painfully fair – and all the more alarming for that. Wright takes readers through the grisly story <b>of</b> L&nbsp;Ron Hubbard's <b>sci-fi</b> cult: the abuse of the <b>faithful</b> and their children; the use of the lawyers, blackmail, smears and threats to terrorise apostates; the infiltration of state bureaucracies; <b>and</b> the relentless demands for money from<br><img src="invisiblebread.com/comics/2012-10-09-tough-decision.png"><br> initiates, which have made the church fabulously wealthy.The public is interested in Knox's story and should be able to read it. Given that Scientology is a global racket <b>with</b> a British arm, there is a public interest in publishing Wright's book. But you <b>cannot</b> buy either of them in the bookshops. British publishers <b>decided</b> not to print for fear of <b>the</b> libel law.Wright tells me the <b>Scientologists</b> hired solicitors from the London law firm Carter<br><img src="static.ddmcdn.com/gif/dog-best-friend-1.jpg"><br> Ruck.<br> They told the publisher Transworld that if it dared allow British readers to see his work, they would sue.<br> Meanwhile, the British <b>arm</b> of HarperCollins – which, to declare an interest, publishes my efforts – refused to <b>release</b> Knox's memoirs <b>because</b> it was frightened of <b>actions</b> from Italian police and prosecutors.You can still buy both books from America via Amazon. But what kind of grubby, hole-in-the-corner half-freedom is that <b>and</b> why <a href = "micro-niche-finder.webs.com">micro niche finder review </a> expect us to be grateful <b>for</b> it? After listing countries from Brazil to France <b>where</b> Going Clear was on open sale, Wright told me that he did not understand this country: "When I <b>think</b> of Britain, I think of the gutter press.<br> You allow that but don't allow serious work." I replied that the two went together, even though Parliament had reformed the libel law.Maybe publishers are cowards. If they had the courage to fight the censors in courts, perhaps they could use the new law to advance the public's right to read without restrictions.But<br> Parliament has not limited the costs of going to court.<br> Our unreformed legal profession is just as grasping <b>as</b> Hubbard was and a libel case can cost millions.<br> Neither ordinary citizens, who want to correct <b>lies</b> about them, nor writers, who want to defend the truth of what they have published, are prepared to risk so much at the judiciary's casino.<br> Not least because the judges have loaded the dice.You would never know it but the British have legal protections for free speech. Article 10 of the Human Rights Act states: "Everyone has the <b>right</b> of freedom of expression. This right shall include freedom to hold opinions and to receive and impart information and ideas without interference by public authority…"The reason why <b>you've</b> never heard of Article 10 is that the judges never enforce it.<br> They have created a vast law of privacy but done nothing to enhance our rights to speak, argue <b>and</b> investigate or, indeed, to protect the rights we once <b>had.Freedom<br></b> does not just depend on laws.<br> The culture of modern Britain matters as much and it is instinctively authoritarian.<br> When presented with <b>an</b> unpleasant argument, the default response of the outraged is to call for a ban.<br> It is as if only by demanding criminal punishment can we prove that our disapproval is truly righteous. Hence, the stories that pepper <b>the</b> press of the courts convicting citizens for racist, homophobic, anti-English or anti-Welsh insults.It never occurs to the bureaucracy that a desire to punish is a neurotic symptom of liberal insecurity.<br> Because<br><img src="dims.vetstreet.com/dims3/MMAH/resize/630x420/quality/90/s3.…"><br> I am called Cohen interviewers ask whether I would ban Holocaust-denial. I reply that racists, like misogynists and homophobes, do not have good arguments or even weak ones.<br> Their views are not difficult to ridicule and refute.<br> If you cannot beat a racist in open debate without <b>calling</b> for the police, you shouldn't <b>be</b> in the debating business in the first place and must step aside <b>and</b> make way for <b>someone</b> who can.Never believe that you can safely confine the urge to punish and control to people you dislike.<br> Because of its excessive <b>secrecy,</b> Britain remains excessively deferential. Politicians are meant to be the subject of unfair attacks.<br> Yet their laws <b>are</b> barely scrutinised as the whips beat them through Parliament. Celebrities are meant to suffer hideous invasions<br><img src="1.bp.blogspot.com/-oYDafn-gT9M/Tl913376ZFI/AAAAAAAAA9I/uvDD…"><br> of their privacy. Yet the ability of Jimmy Savile and Stuart Hall to act as they did while the staff <b>of</b> the BBC looked the other way suggested that celebrities' privacy <b>has</b> not been invaded enough.Hardly<br> anyone notices that the press, online financial commentators, business broadcasters and academic economics journals<br><img src="imfunny.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Barbie-fake-funny.jpg"><br> failed to warn that the banks were careering towards ruin.<br><img src="cutestuff.co/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/cute-dog-cuddling-a…"><br> Their ignorance was unsurprising. They could not investigate.<br> They <b>could</b> not persuade judges and, indeed, their fellow citizens that they had the right to challenge<br><img src="imfunny.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/funny-dog-pictures-p…"><br> the powerful, even if their challenges <b>were</b> not <b>correct</b> in every particular.<br> Now we are bankrupt and have no idea <b>what</b> to do next.Still, <b>we</b> have our irony, eh. The <b>knowing</b> smiles on pink, superior faces that&nbsp; tell the world we have nothing serious&nbsp;to&nbsp;say.<br> • This article will be opened for comments on Sunday morningFreedom of speechAmanda KnoxScientologyPress freedomNewspapers & magazinesNewspapersPublishingNick Cohenguardian.co.uk &copy; 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies.<br> All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; When they aren’t listening to music or playing a game on their devices, people who work from home can stay on task with <b>a</b> range of productivity apps.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Florian Thauvin scored twice to give France a win against Ghana and <a href = "productreviewer4u.webs.com/fat-burning-furnace">fat-burning-furnace </a> in the Under-20 World Cup final against Uruguay, which beat Iraq on penalties after a 1-1 draw.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> Military superiority is not enough to <b>maintain</b> U.S. strength and influence in the world, and the United States must build global institutions and expand international partnerships beyond its traditional allies, according to a new national security strategy prepared by the Obama administration. Three new picture books structured<br><img src="lovelystationery.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/lovely-stat…"><br> around the unusual characteristics of wombats, bears and sloths.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> Put down your steak knife and stop salivating <b>over</b> the butter.<br> When Jessica Otto thinks back to eight months ago, when she arrived in Washington, she still sounds bewildered. BOGOTA, <b>COLOMBIA</b> -- A retired police major who is in <b>exile</b> in Argentina was deposed Tuesday by the Colombian attorney general's office after he accused President Álvaro Uribe's brother of having led a right-wing paramilitary group in the early 1990s.<br> In Japan, company executives on Friday said that they were confident that engineers had eliminated all risk of fire<br><img src="photos.motogp.com/2012/11/11/girl_10_preview_big.jpg"><br> or smoke from the troubled plane’s batteries. The use of a military air base<br><img src="rachelmiller1511.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/mom.jpg"><br> to transport civilian guests to the wedding of a wealthy family has set off anger.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> KABUL — Afghan President Hamid Karzai acknowledged Saturday that he has frequently received money from the CIA and that he had been promised the agency would continue making such payments.<br> At a <b>news</b> conference, Karzai said the payments<br><img src="0.tqn.com/d/urbanlegends/1/0/x/6/1/cheese-nails-dog-parks.j…"><br> amounted to “a government <b>institution</b> <b>helping</b> another government <b>institution,</b> and we appreciate all this assistance and help.” Read full article &#62;&#62;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; House Republican Deputy Whip Peter Roskam (R-Ill.) said Thursday morning that the Senate immigration bill likely won't come to a vote in the House, labeling it a "pipe dream." "The <b>House</b> has no capacity to move that bill in its entirety," he told a breakfast hosted by the National Review. "It just <b>won't</b> happen.<br> It is a pipe dream to think that bill is going to go to <b>the</b> floor and be voted on." Read full article &#62;&#62;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; This week, Lobel’s new shop, a vegetable knife with a special blade <b>and</b> more.<br> <b>20153</b> BOUNDARIES: Stringfellow Road to the west, Route 50 to the north, the Fairfax <b>County</b> Parkway to the east, and Melville Lane (including Morning <b>Spring</b> Lane and Marshall Hall Lane) to <b>the</b> south. SCHOOLS: Greenbriar East and Greenbriar West <b>elementary</b> schools, Rocky <b>Run</b> Middle School and Chan...<br> <b>Actor</b> Sir Patrick Stewart and author Sarah Waters also offer prizes at <b>party's</b> first annual arts dinnerThe Turner-prize-winning artists Anish Kapoor and Antony Gormley are among a group of leading artists, writers and actors who have donated works to Labour to be <b>auctioned</b> at a <b>new</b> annual arts dinner to be hosted by Ed Miliband on Thursday.Among the prizes up for grabs, Sir Patrick <b>Stewart</b> is offering a private Shakespearean recital while the three-times Man-Booker-nominated author Sarah Waters will join the winner's book group.Kapoor,<br> who designed the Olympic Park's vast central sculpture-cum-viewing platform, the Orbit, has donated an untitled painting that shows his "iconic use of imagery and colour", according to <b>Labour.Gormley,</b> whose Angel of the North overlooking the A1 in Gateshead has become one of Britain's best-known modern landmarks, has donated a drawing titled Feeling Material XXXVII which describes "the space of the body using a matrix formed of rings", the artist said.The portrait artist Nicola Green <b>has</b> donated a print of Barack Obama <b>from</b> her In Seven<br><img src="cutestuff.co/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/cute-dog-cuddling-a…"><br> Days series after she followed the future president<br><img src="imfunny.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/funny-dog-pictures-p…"><br> on the campaign trail <b>between</b> August 2008 and January 2009.The Labour arts dinner is designed to reaffirm what the party describes as its "resolute relationship" with Britain's artistic community. Harriet Harman, the party's deputy leader who is also shadow culture <b>secretary,</b> insisted the dinner was not a throwback to<br><img src="photoity.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/20-Examples-Of-Love…"><br> Labour's infamous "luvvies" era of the 1980s when Neil Kinnock was mocked for staging a series of events <b>with</b> artists who were highly critical <b>of</b> the Thatcher government. Harman said Britain's arts and creative industries were vital for growth but were under threat from government cuts.Miliband is a theatre fan, and a former trustee of the Royal Court.Harman<br> said: "Our inaugural arts dinner comes at an important moment for the arts and the<br><img src="photos.motogp.com/2012/11/11/girl_10_preview_big.jpg"><br> creative industries. <b>Our</b> arts and creative industries <a href = "productreviewer4u.webs.com/google-sniper">google sniper </a> successful.<br> They are internationally admired, creating jobs and enriching the life of our nation. But the arts face great challenges. Government support, essential to nurturing the arts,<br><img src="cutestuff.co/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/cute-dog-cuddling-a…"><br> is now seriously threatened."Labour<br> will support the arts – and support the arts community. Together we will remake <b>the</b> <b>arguments</b> for the arts which we made, together, in the runup to 1997.<br> Together, we<br><img src="0.tqn.com/d/urbanlegends/1/0/x/6/1/cheese-nails-dog-parks.j…"><br> will work to forge a programme for our manifesto for <b>our</b> vision for <b>the</b> arts and creative industries for 2015 and beyond."LabourParty<br> fundingArts <b>policyAnish</b> KapoorAntony GormleySarah WatersArtNicholas Wattguardian.co.uk<br> &copy; 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved.<br> | <b>Use</b> of this content<br><img src="img.izismile.com/img/img5/20121218/640/most_wtf_celebrity_p…"><br> is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds England was stunned in Ashes action on Thursday as an Australia debutant, Ashton Agar, made the highest score by a No. <b>11</b> batsman in a record last-wicket stand.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Some cried, some cheered.<br> Many Latin Americans <b>mourned</b> the death of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, leaders in Europe and Asia sent condolences, and Iran's president predicted <b>great</b> works in the afterlife. This is part of an occasional series of features profiling academic departments at MIT. For decades, many students came to MIT’s Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics with one goal in mind: to be an astronaut. Starting in the 1960s and the Apollo era, sending humans into space was a national priority, and a very real possibility for many students.<br> During this period, MIT graduated more astronauts than any other university, with the exception of the U.S. military academies. Alumni from AeroAstro, as the department is known, have <b>participated</b> in one-third of all U.S. space<br><img src="3.bp.blogspot.com/-Woy1h4DCA6E/UMDYaOzkQvI/AAAAAAAACCw/a2Ay…"><br> flights, collectively logging more than 10,000 hours in space.<br> <b>And</b> Buzz Aldrin PhD ’63, one of the department’s stars, is <b>among</b> <b>four</b> AeroAstro graduates to <b>have</b> walked <b>on</b> the surface of the <b>moon.<br></b> Today, while some AeroAstro students <b>still</b> dream of becoming the next moonwalker, others are exploring new <b>frontiers</b> in aerospace engineering, <b>from</b> miniature satellite propulsion and fuel-efficient aviation to automated airplane <b>manufacturing</b> and unmanned spacecraft. This last field, in particular, has generated global buzz with this year’s landing of the Curiosity rover on Mars.<br> In <b>fact,</b> several AeroAstro alums had front-row seats to the landing<br><img src="img.izismile.com/img/img3/20100825/640/the_most_amazing_640…"><br> as mission engineers <b>in</b> NASA’s control room.<br> During the live feed <b>of</b> <b>the</b> landing, broadcast around the world, flight director Bobak Ferdowsi SM ’03 caused an Internet sensation <b>with</b> his <b>red</b> and blue mohawk — a tribute to the American flag, and a look that seemed to say, “This <b>isn’t</b> your grandfather’s rocket science.” A department, reinventedIndeed, as the aerospace industry <b>has</b><br><img src="digitalbloggers.com/normalguy/files/2012/11/lovely_bones_00…"><br> evolved, so has AeroAstro. When the department was formally established in 1939, research and education revolved around one <b>main</b> question: What does it take for a vehicle to fly? Faculty and students tackled the then-new fields of propulsion, controls and aerodynamics, and flew experiments in the department’s Wright Brothers Wind Tunnel (opened in 1938), a state-of-the-art facility that the U.S.<br> government used during World War <b>II</b> to test military airplanes. Following <b>the</b> launch of Sputnik in 1957, the <b>department</b> expanded its efforts to include studies in space exploration.<br> Major discoveries made in AeroAstro’s Instrumentation Lab — now the Draper Laboratory — provided the guidance, navigation and control systems that helped shepherd the Apollo spacecraft to the moon.<br> In the 1980s, human performance in space became a new departmental focus, propelled in part by the launch of NASA’s space shuttle program. MIT’s Man Vehicle Laboratory began to <b>develop</b> experiments on vestibular function, spatial disorientation and motion sickness in space, tests that were carried out on subsequent shuttle missions.<br> Speaking after four other presidents sang his praises at the dedication of his Dallas library, an emotional George W.<br> Bush called his time in office "the honor of a lifetime." "There was a time in my life I wouldn't be found in a library, much less found one," Bush joked at the start of <b>his</b> remarks. But he quickly turned serious. While President Obama and former presidents Bill Clinton, Jimmy Carter and George H.W.<br> Bush avoided areas of disagreement with the 43rd president in their remarks, Bush acknowledged the controversy surrounding his tenure.<br> Read full article

Niente da visualizzare